Bananian

Bug in bananian-config?

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Hi Nico,

With reference to the latest version 14.09, I had a problem when I was trying to set the locale in bananian-config.

The default seems to be en_US.UTF-8 UTF-8 but I wanted to change it to en_GB.UTF-8 UTF-8 (rest assured, it's nothing personal against those darn Yanks).


I did so, but after confirming it, on the next page it gave me only the options of 'None' or 'en_US.UTF-8 UTF-8' and did not seem to register my change.


It happened on 3 separate installs last week and it's possible that because I am a noob I did it incorrectly, but you might just want to quickly investigate if that is indeed the case. It's not all that important and it's not the end of the world if I have to put up with an American locale.


I cannot try it out now because I don't have a spare SD card to install on to and do a quick check.


Unfortunately for you, I won't using Bananian at any time in the near future as I am only interested in distros with GUIs. (I did try installing an X-server but I only only ended up breaking the install - that's how incompetent I am.)


Also, I have no idea how bash works, so for the zsh shell I am completely clueless.


But it's clear to me that for certain applications, your OS is a boon.


Thx



Thanks for reporting, I will check if there is a problem.

Wow, you are super quick and efficient!!

If only everything in this world and in my life was like that..........

tkaiser  
I won't using Bananian at any time in the near future as I am only interested in distros with GUIs. (I did try installing an X-server but I only only ended up breaking the install


Theoretically all you have to do is:

0) visit https://wiki.debian.org/DesktopEnvironment and pick the desktop environment which fits your needs (I would prefer a lightweight like Xfce or LXDE). Click on the appropriate link and follow the advices to install the desktop environment (they're rather simple). In case you want to give eg. LXDE a try:

1) run bananian-config once and enable "Video acceleration"

2) reboot

3) do an "apt-get install task-lxde-desktop" (that's really all it needs)

Afterwards you should be done. I just tried it and unfortunately that wasn't true since the installation of the many packages task-lxde-desktop contains failed due to dependency mismatch. I did what most of the times helps in such situations:
  1. apt-get update && apt-get -f upgrade
Copy the Code
Everything ok now and one reboot later the Banana started directly into X-Windows as expected. So while it might theoretically be an easy task to setup the desktop environment of your choice 'the Debian way' it's not that easy for beginners if something went wrong. In other words: Bananian might not be the best choice if you just want to use your BananaPi with a GUI

Reply 4# tkaiser



Thanks for those instructions - I will definitely give them a try next time I have a spare card and want to try out Bananian again with a GUI. (But as you pointed out, it's not really designed for that kind of use.)




I think I tried a variety of installs, ranging from Gnome (light and full versions), KDE (also light and full) and also Xorg (is that also a GUI or only a DE? - not sure of the difference to be truthful). And that's where I ended up breaking it.


I searched for LXDE as I know that's what's in Raspbian but I didn't expect the package to be called "task-lxde-desktop".


I had an idea that enabling video acceleration was somehow important, but maybe I only switched that on after I had attempted adding the GUI - can't remember.
   

it's not that easy for beginners if something went wrong.



Ooh, you're so right. Many's the time I was trying to type in terminal commands on an RPM-based distro only to find out that my instructions were only for deb-based machines (don't laugh please!). Even had the experience where a set of commands for a particular distro (Ubuntu I think it was) were only valid and worked solely for one specific version.


The key to success is indeed interpreting correctly error messages and knowing what to do if and when something goes wrong.


At superficial level, I understand what 'dependency mismatch' means, but at a deeper level (which you need to make something work properly) I don't.

tkaiser  
I searched for LXDE as I know that's what's in Raspbian but I didn't expect the package to be called "task-lxde-desktop"


Me too (since I haven't used Linux with a GUI for more than a decade). I just did a web search for 'debian lxde' and chose the first link. I read the few words regarding different variants and simply gave it a try. And when the installation process stuck (while dependencies -- see below -- weren't met) I simply decided to try the 'usual approach' in such situations: The aforementioned forced apt-get update/upgrade.

Regarding dependencies: Complex software packages rely on many different other packages. Mostly in very specific versions. That's where packet management jumps in: When you choose to install "task-lxde-desktop" not one but many different packages will be needed which might need other packages to be installed which might also... You can find it out yourself: https://packages.debian.org/en/wheezy/task-lxde-desktop (from there click on eg. lxde, from there on lxappearance and so on...

And in my case two packages were reported as being in conflict with each other and "apt-get -f upgrade" fixed it. It took just 6 commands to type (when 2 x 'shutdown -r now' counts also) to get a complete LXDE environment up and running. But since Debian is my distro of choice when I have to cope with Linux servers I already knew what to do when the message regarding conflicting packages appeared

Post Last Edited by roses2at at 2014-10-3 15:03
Regarding dependencies.......
tkaiser Posted at 3-10-2014 02:01 PM


Your second paragraph I did comprehend - that's what I meant by understanding that phrase at superficial level. Any deeper than that however, and I'm in trouble.


What exactly was the message you received which informed you two packages were in conflict with each other? Can you post a screenshot of it so I can recognise it for myself next time?


And though of course I knew about update and upgrade (I'm only now beginning to learn I can combine them with the double ampersand between them on the same line), I did not know about the -f force switch.


But isn't forcing something like that more likely to break a system than have the desired effect of everything working in harmony from thereonafter?

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